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two for two

Happy International Women's Day!  I miss my college days, when this was A THING and the Women's Center threw a big. blowout dinner with wine and candles and presents (that's where I first discovered Sudie Rakusin's work.  One year, Anne got us all her "The Coloring Book for Big Girls."  WAAAAY before the adult coloring craze).

I guess I took part in the strike in my own way by looking at the number on caller ID and thinking "Oh, I THINK NOT!"

[Both of my days off, and they try to call me in.  Has no one heard of caregiver burnout?  And is there NO ONE else to call?]

I have to admit feeling conflicted about the strike.  While I support it in theory, in practice it is beyond exclusionary.  Many (most?) women cannot afford to take a day off without pay, especially WOC/queer women/poor women/trans women.  Schools and daycares closing because of the strike put other women scrambling to find childcare.  Hell, if all of the women at Happy Acres went on strike ..

...well, assuming they didn't call out, which is always a possibility...

...we would have 4 men in the kitchen (assuming they all worked at the same time), one guy in housekeeping, 2 med techs, and 4 PCAs.

To run a facility with 96 people.  Yeah, THAT would go well.

I've decided I'll have a sit down with TPTB tomorrow and suggest that maybe, just MAYBE asking me to come in should involve offering to pick me up in the van instead of taking the bus (they do it all the time.  Why not me?).  Or, in exchange of SAVING THEIR ASSES during the week, they could save me  a cab ride or two on the weekends.

Hell, two managers and one of the people on MC floor went out on a joyride to get takeout from Outback last weekend.  They were gone almost two hours.  If that's okay, surely a 15 minute ride home wouldn't be untoward.

I think this haircut is making me all fiesty.  :)

Comments

( 11 comments — Leave a comment )
goddessdi
Mar. 8th, 2017 08:11 pm (UTC)

I happened today off work or else I wouldn't have been able to participate. I wore red and enjoyed my day celebrating women and our contributions to the world.

My frustration with today came from men who called women "whiny snowflakes" for striking. It's worked in so many European countries to show what it would be like if no women working but our society in the US is so mysoginistic. It's hard for me as someone in a relationship with a trans man who works in the trans community to not see both sides of the argument. I figure I should just use my privilege where I can and let all women know I'm using my voice for them.

amw
Mar. 8th, 2017 08:30 pm (UTC)
The issue about whether privilege plays a part in the ability to strike is an interesting topic, but it's also being blown out of proportion as a de-motivation tactic, imo.

Historically there are successful strikes where the workers striked and The Man lost. The catch is they were en masse. One or two people not showing up to work is not enough - everyone has to not show up for work. The Man can't fire everyone. And loss of wages is a great reason to unionize and/or collectively negotiate an agreement that fixes the injustice.

Of course, it's very easy for me as an extremely privileged salaried worker with flex-time to spout socialist/syndicalist talking points. Back in the real world, I definitely respect that many people are not able to strike, especially in America where there are little-to-no protections for workers. Hell, y'all don't even have guaranteed holiday pay, or sick leave, or maternity leave. But I do think it's important for American workers to realize just how badly they have it. While the rest of the world continues to have a relatively strong workers' movement, in America that seems to be all but dead. I am not sure how to change that, but perhaps a very successful general strike could be one of those ways?

Regarding healthcare industry in particular, this is definitely a more difficult problem. I was actually talking about it with my colleagues over lunch today. I explained that in Canada they do rotating strikes, but that's still not perfect, because less care workers is still less care workers, and the people who are suffering are not the owners of the facility but the patients/clients :( I guess this is why you get cross-industry solidarity, so that people who are able to strike can strike on behalf of those who can't? I probably need to educate myself more on all of this stuff.

In the mean time, i striked with privilege today, specifically in solidarity and for those who could not.


Edited at 2017-03-08 11:47 pm (UTC)
mamculuna
Mar. 8th, 2017 09:02 pm (UTC)
Yeah, I was like that about the strike too. Too many women who just can't take off--either they give up a day's pay or risk losing their job, or both. If there's a clear concrete goal, a strike might be worth the sacrifice, but this is too vague and general.

I'm retired, so all I did was not spend money. But I do that lots of days...
mamculuna
Mar. 8th, 2017 09:15 pm (UTC)
Yeah, I was like that about the strike too. Too many women who just can't take off--either they give up a day's pay or risk losing their job, or both. If there's a clear concrete goal, a strike might be worth the sacrifice, but this is too vague and general.

I'm retired, so all I did was not spend money. But I do that lots of days...
praxedes_osaka
Mar. 8th, 2017 10:36 pm (UTC)
Happy International Women's Day! ^3^

While I love the idea of the strike, I've been in the "if I take off, I lose my job" boat. :( It feels too much like the attitude is "well, we can find some other woman to do your job and who will be more grateful." I'm grateful for the job, but I should be paid more than minimum wage for providing classroom instruction or for taking care of your infant while you make enough money to have all three kids in private daycare, and my kid is a latch-key kid who has to get himself out the door for school because I had to catch the bus to get to work on time.

So, I stayed home and didn't do much at all today, including home-school Ringo.

My brother wore red to school, and has been bombarding his FB with information on wage gaps, health care gaps, etc. He's in an field that is dominated by women, and he is very well aware of the imbalance of it all.
seaivy
Mar. 9th, 2017 12:07 am (UTC)
GO FIESTY!!!!

and if they want you make them come and get you!

i didn't plan it but i basically said - F**K IT to my to do list today
be a woman on my own terms!
did what i wanted to do!
monkiainen
Mar. 9th, 2017 05:38 am (UTC)
I couldn't take a day off yesterday, since there are only two nurses in the late shift anyway and it wouldn't have been fair for my co-worker to take care of all the residents by herself. But our work uniform has red on it and I didn't spend any money yesterday, so I still got two out of three.
mac_arthur_park
Mar. 14th, 2017 02:13 am (UTC)
This is why I like you (okay, one reason). You actually realized sticking your coworker with all the residents isn't fair to anyone.

Wanna come work at Happy Acres? ;)
monkiainen
Mar. 15th, 2017 05:32 am (UTC)
As tempting as it is to work with you, I think I'm going to pass. I have feeling I'm bit too liberal for the current government so getting a Green Card would probably need... a quite a lot of work.
communitybee
Mar. 9th, 2017 07:28 am (UTC)
I worked as a Thank You to the above bosses who believed in me more than I EVER believed in myself.... The work was not exciting though.

You have to take pictures of your hair.
pheloniusfriar
Mar. 10th, 2017 02:48 pm (UTC)
Yeah, we were having a discussion here as well about striking as a communications tool. Privilege definitely plays a part in it for people in the US and Canada, but there are places and times where it was universal and monumental. I am, of course, thinking about the strike in Iceland in the 70s where 90% of women walked out, and changed that country forever (and in Argentina last year even though change remains slow to come in that case). I do wistfully yearn that such a thing could happen here too. As with all conversations, a diversity of position and capacities need to be expressed, and just because someone can participate where others cannot, does not meet that they should choose not to participate on those grounds (as amw says, that argument is used as a de-motivational tactic by those attempting to dissipate the movement). As long as those who can do not criticize those who cannot (or will not out of fear), it seems to be a message that needs to be shouted, and backed up with whatever action is possible.
( 11 comments — Leave a comment )