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well, fuck

I was convinced that the deadline for LJI was this coming Tuesday.  I had a piece half written that I'm really pleased with, but....nope.  I got home so late (an hour and twenty fucking minutes of waiting for my relief, then waiting on the cab, and eventually making it home and swigging chardonnay straight from the bottle.  Yeah, and Sundays are supposed to be my EASY day?) it wouldn't have mattered.

I was upset.  I told Kent.  He channelled his dad and suggested that I need to pay more attention to details.  I was about to counter that he needs to start paying more attention to his right hand, because that's about to be his primary relationship if he's going to continue being an asshole when he told me I'm not going to be able to do brunch tomorrow like I'd planned.

He's got training.  For the new job.  So, yeaah, yay and more money and your life isgoing to be easier and fewer cabs and..

Okay.  This is all good stuff.  But.....

YOU SUCKERED ME INTO THIS JOB AT HAPPY ACRES AND ARE FUCKING ABANDONING ME!?!?!?!?!?

And going back to food service on top of it.  Now, technically, dietary manager/kitchen manager is food service of sorts, but it's not the same as a restaurant where expectations lie beyond "edible.  Or at least not toxic."

You know how many residents are going to have abandonment issues?  Kent caters to their whims and goes the extra mile (or six.  Or twelve).  I'm betting the next person in that position won't do the same.

And I'm going to have residents following me around wanting to know where he's gone, and why.  And some who will probably be extra clingy because if *he's* left, what's to stop me?  The majority of the residents see us as a matched set, so....

Yeah.  Yippee.

I *did* have an amazing  moment with a resident this weekend.  She really should be in memory care, but her family insists otherwise (it's ridiculous.  We have people who should be in MC and aren't because of the stigma, and people in MC who shouldn't because their families just wish they would go away).  She spends most of her time holding her baby doll and humming or singing.

Yesterday, I realized that I KNEW that tune.  So I went up to her, knelt down, and started humming with her.

She lit up and grabbed my hand.  And then she started to sing.  And I started to sing with her.

Showtunes.  That gets through to her.  And, hey!  That is so my wheelhouse.

I sat on the floor and held her hand.  She stroked my hair and we sang.

I held it together until she started in with "If I loved you, words wouldn't come in an easy way..."

At least I did the dignified, tears slipping down your cheeks cry.  She did the same thing.

I need to do some research about music and the elderly, especially people with dementia.  I bet we could develop some programs that would be beneficial. Even if it is just sitting around and singing.

And this is why I am probably never leaving this place.  Damn you, Kent!

In other, music-related news, I officially have my ticket to see Alan Cumming!  *swoonthud*  It's not until the end of April, so I need all of y'all to remind me that these extra hours I'm putting in (however unwillingly) are just adding up to me being able to walk up to the merch table and say "I'll take one of everything."

Happy Sunday!  Happy (early) Spring Equinox!

Bonus random question:  if you have an earworm at the moment, what is it?

This is brought to you by the fact that I have had a Sylvia's Mother by Dr. Hook earworm since MONDAY.  No, I don't know why.

Comments

( 23 comments — Leave a comment )
dandelion_diva
Mar. 20th, 2017 04:08 am (UTC)
Have I got a documentary for you! :) It's called Alive Inside and it is precisely what you're talking about. I could have sworn there was a book as well, but I do know that Oliver Sacks wrote a book about the brain on music.
xo_kizzy_xo
Mar. 20th, 2017 12:06 pm (UTC)
Music was a big thing at the MC unit my mother was in. They always had something playing in the solarium. If Mom was agitated, bringing her in there and singing along with whatever was playing calmed her down.

The whole music/memory thing is well documented, along with why you tend to remember songs from your youth (hence the "oldies") more so than what's popular in your real time. With my mother it was the Big Band era and showtunes.
nightshade1972
Mar. 20th, 2017 04:18 am (UTC)
This is my earworm right now. "One Love," Pat Benatar.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IOgxVWC4a18
eyelid
Mar. 20th, 2017 05:05 am (UTC)
I think I read an article years ago about how people were trying music therapy with people with dementia.
communitybee
Mar. 20th, 2017 09:27 am (UTC)
Mannnn.. Sorry abiut the LJI. That sucks,

You really have a Connection to your patients, which is wonderful, but the co workers and stuff... Ugh!!!
spikesgirl58
Mar. 20th, 2017 11:57 am (UTC)
Wow, what a fabulous story. Yeah, you're stuck there, both my the residents and your heart.

As for Sylvia's Mother, I suggest a rounding chorus of "It's a Small World" That usually kills any earworm.
xo_kizzy_xo
Mar. 20th, 2017 12:07 pm (UTC)
Forgot to add - OMG, Slyvia's Mother! I haven't heard anything by Dr. Hook in eons, LOL!
gneu
Mar. 20th, 2017 12:11 pm (UTC)
I suckered a friend into joining my Boy Scout troop, then I abruptly quit afterward. That wasn't my plan, and I did feel bad about it, because he knew no one else in my troop.
yshaloo
Mar. 20th, 2017 01:42 pm (UTC)
I woke up yesterday with Tove Lo's "Timebomb" stuck in my head. Then at bedtime I forced her song "Moments" in there to knock out "Timebomb" because I was driving myself crazy.
yrpreciousheart
Mar. 20th, 2017 01:55 pm (UTC)
Oh! I actually know some things about alzheimer's and music!

For a brief primer:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MdYplKQ4JBc
but Oliver Sack's whole book 'Musicophilia' is amazing and totally intriguing.

To unintentionally kill your heart:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKDXuCE7LeQ
yrpreciousheart
Mar. 20th, 2017 01:56 pm (UTC)
Oh! I just saw someone else posted these same things. :)
yrpreciousheart
Mar. 20th, 2017 01:57 pm (UTC)
Oh! I actually know some things about alzheimer's and music!

For a brief primer:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MdYplKQ4JBc
but Oliver Sack's whole book 'Musicophilia' is amazing and totally intriguing.

To unintentionally kill your heart:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKDXuCE7LeQ
yrpreciousheart
Mar. 20th, 2017 01:57 pm (UTC)
Oh! I actually know some things about alzheimer's and music!

For a brief primer:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MdYplKQ4JBc
but Oliver Sack's whole book 'Musicophilia' is amazing and totally intriguing.

To unintentionally kill your heart:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKDXuCE7LeQ
lorigami
Mar. 20th, 2017 03:33 pm (UTC)
oh my word. that brought me to tears. show tunes.
<3
dimity_blue
Mar. 20th, 2017 04:13 pm (UTC)
That's so sad and so sweet. "If I Loved You" alwys makes me tear up.
redqueenofevil
Mar. 20th, 2017 05:11 pm (UTC)
The moment with the lady singing show tunes made me teary eyed.
vegawriters
Mar. 20th, 2017 05:48 pm (UTC)
Happy Equinox!

And yay about Alan Cumming! So jealous!
adoptedwriter
Mar. 20th, 2017 08:12 pm (UTC)

Music is incredibly therapeutic as well as entertaining. Works on kids, animals and senior people. Actually it works for everybody.

promiseoftin
Mar. 20th, 2017 11:27 pm (UTC)
That is so sweet about the showtune-singing lady. :)
circumspectly
Mar. 21st, 2017 03:02 am (UTC)
Dang it, now I have an earworm of If I Loved You. Specifically this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9q3x1t9JdBM
because Audra McDonald is my spirit animal (so is Steve Perry, but that's a different story).

There's that one youtube video about music and dementia...I just remember the old man who came back to life while listening to music...I'm sure you've seen it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Zo_JQZo3Y0&t=130s

Happy Alan Cumming!! <3
jadecat
Mar. 21st, 2017 01:38 pm (UTC)
When I was looking up Alzheimer's stuff for my dad - music was one of the things I kept seeing. I think there really is something to it- a way of reaching people whose minds have wandered off the usual pathways.

Sadly for my dad, his hearing was so bad that he couldn't really hear the music anymore. Broke my heart because back when he could hear, and was himself, he had music on every chance he got.
weebleswobble
Mar. 21st, 2017 03:33 pm (UTC)
i have a cousin who goes to nursing homes and does 'music therapy', playing songs and singing for the residents.
monkiainen
Mar. 21st, 2017 03:55 pm (UTC)
Music + dementia patients = always works. Which is one of the reasons why we are regularly singing with the residents if we have time for it.
( 23 comments — Leave a comment )